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TitleVEGETATIVE PROPAGATION
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Children are aware about the different parts of the plant. Seen plants growing around.

The Lesson Growing Plants and the term Vegetation Propogation is introduced by asking a few questions 

Perception:

 

  • Have you seen plants growing around?
  • Do all plants grow from seeds?
  • Can plants grow from

      a stem?a root?

  • Dispersal of seeds
  • Then the term Vegetative  and Propagation  is introduced 

 

It will be explained and shown through activity that plants not only grow from the seeds they also grow from different parts of the plant body too

 

The student will

  •  List, describe and identify plant parts
  • Compare and contrast changes in root and stem functions
  • Identify cause and effect relationships of plant growth
  • List and describe growth of plants without seeds vegetative growth
  • Describe growth of  ( moulds and mushroom  )

 

Growing Plants

Teacher Background Information for explanation

Human beings, other animals and plants are the living organisms that exist on earth. Plants are the only organisms able to sustain themselves by producing their own food. In turn, they provide food for animals and humans, through the food chain. Almost all plants have one common characteristic making them different from animals. Plants, such as trees, flowers, fruits and vegetables, produce chlorophyll, a substance that allows them to convert solar energy into nutrition, or food.

Humans, as well as animals, on the other hand, obtain their nutrition either by consuming plants or by consuming other animals. Humans eat both meat and plants. Some plants, however, are not able to use sunlight and soil to produce their own source of energy.

 For example, molds  obtaining their energy directly from the plant or animal they live ontheir host. Furthermore,

plants such as  fern ,moulds do not reproduce through seeds; theyreproduce by creating spores.

 

                                 spores in a fern              sporangium(single spore)

 

 

 

Many plants do not have to grow from seeds. A potato, for example, is not a seed, but it can reproduce itself by growing roots from a specialized part of thepotato. Other plants (some cacti) can begin to grow if a small piece of the plant falls on soil. After growing roots, if then the potato is anchored in the soil, it will receive nutrients and produce more potatoes. Some plants send out underground roots that send up new plants periodically. No flowering plants grow from spores. Like a seed, a spore develops into an embryo. Unlike a seed, the spore does not contain food to enable the embryo to grow. The plant that develops must get its food from a host.

·        Moulds are plants that grow on their hosts, taking nutrients directly from them.

 

·        Moulds do not require light or soil since they don’t produce their own food the way other plants do, but they do require moisture. The food moulds eat are the bread, jelly, cheese, fruit,

 

·        These foods are called “hosts”. Introduced information about molds so that there is no misconception about the two types of plants.

Although young children are familiar with plants, many may not have had the opportunity to examine them closely, to plant seeds and watch them grow

The first activities for this unit, then, will include working directly with plants to develop the main ideas and will include examining different aspects of plants and plant life.

  • Students will learn about the parts of plants and their seeds and about the process of photosynthesis.
  • Students will make distinctions among plants by examining and planting seeds, rooting vegetables and transplanting them.
  • Students will grow moulds and compare them to other types of plants. matter, or in symbiotic association with each other, usually for mutual benefit.

A fungus has the form of a tubular branched filament that branches increasingly, intermeshing into irregular networks. Some filaments pack together in dense orderly patterns producing, for example, mushrooms. Like molds, fungi

have the ability to produce spores and to disperse them for greater distribution.

Lichens are symbiotic associations of algae and fungi.


 

 

 

  • Have you seen plants growing around?
  • Do all plants grow from seeds?
  • Can plants grow from

      a stem?

 a root?

  • Dispersal of seeds

 

Then the term Vegetative  and Propagation  is introduced 

It will be explained and shown through activity that plants not only grow from the seeds they also grow from different parts of the plant body too.

 

 

Understanding:

 

Children will be asked to do ACTIVITY related to the topic

  • Grow plants from different parts of the plant in class and observe

 For example

  • Sweet potato  to show how plant grows from ROOT
  • Money plant how it grows from stem

 

Plants also grows from leaves and spores

(SLIDES RELATED WILL BE SHOWN)

  • LEAVES  AND
  • SPORES 

Different ways by which the seeds are dispersed

Analysis:

 

children will be asked to do ACTIVITY related to the topic

  • Grow plants from different parts of the plant in class and observe

 For example

  • Sweet potato  to show how plant grows from ROOT
  • Money plant how it grows from stem

 

Plants also grows from leaves and spores

(SLIDES RELATED WILL BE SHOWN)

  • LEAVES  AND
  • SPORES 

Different ways by which the seeds are dispersed

Synthesis:

 

Students begin exploring plants by examining different types of plants — flowering

plants and nonflowering plants (including vegetables)

Tell students that observing a plant means looking at the different plant parts and guessing their function — what each part does.

Point out that some of the plants

have flowers and others do not.

Evaluation:

 The children will be judged through the activity and questions related to the topic will be asked

Creativity:

 

Whole Group Work

Advance Preparation

Bring some plants to class. As these plants grow, they will be used in other activities.

The plants need to be kept alive until the end of the unit and then may be

taken home..

One week prior to initiation of unit, plant four-to-six non flowering plants

such as  moss and ferns

Obtain: four-to-six flowering plants with flowers, roots and leaves

four-to-six vegetables such as potatoes, carrots, beans, cabbage, chilies

1

 To study plants, we have to collect data, or information, about the plants so we can

see how plants grow, change and reproduce.

Exploring the Idea

Students begin exploring plants by examining different types of plants — flowering

plants and nonflowering plants (including vegetables)

Tell students that observing a plant means looking at the different plant parts and guessing their function — what each part does.

Point out that some of the plants

have flowers and others do not.

Do Activity — Plants.

·        Tell students that they will

           continue making observations on a daily basis in a garden or a park

Objective

·        The students describe the plants and seeds, analyze and categorize them.

Materials

·        Two flowering plants of any type, with flowers, roots and leaves

·        Two non flowering plants such as  mosses, ferns

·        Two vegetables, such as potatoes, carrots, cabbage, beans, chilies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plants reproduce through organs that we call “flowers”, through organs that look like flowers or through making spores. One single plant can make many new plants and is said to “multiply” itself.

Advance Preparation

Place a carrot or potato in water, as shown in Activity —

Plants without Seeds, a week prior to the implementation of this lesson. Mould is also needed and can be grown in a few days on a piece of cheese, bread or some jelly placed in a plastic

bag in a dark, warm place.

Whole Group Work

Materials

Flowering plant or picture of one; mould growing on cheese, bread or jelly; a potato with several eyes; ferns, or mosses; magnifying glasses; potatoes, others

from Activity — Plants Without Seeds; three different simple flowers such as

the lily, poppy or pansy, for each student pair

Word tags: reproduce; womb; multiply; flower; seed; organ; spore

Encountering the Idea

Begin discussion of the lesson by telling students that all living things die, but before plants die they make new plants that are copies of themselves. Ask students how animals are born. Some form in the mother’s womb while other animals hatch from eggs. Ask students to express their ideas of how new plants begin.

Show student a variety of seeds. Ask students where the seeds come from.

Yes, the seeds come from flowers.

·        What is their function?

W e are going to discover why flowers and seeds are important.

·        Are there other ways that plants reproduce, other than by producing seeds?

show a piece of mould growing on bread, jelly or cheese

Tell students that this is a plant also.

·        How can it grow without soil or light?

·        If these plants don’t have flowers, how can they reproduce, make new plants

Show the potato growing in water only.

·        How can this plant grow in water only?

·        Where will it get its food?

·        Does the potato plant have flowers?

·        How will new plants be produced?

They will explore the different ways plants reproduce.

 

 

Photos
plant reproduction
_plant reproduction
http://www.thesecondschool.com/agnelone/archive/2011-12/m/photos/get_image/file/427ca7b2fa51a727e48568cb8104c733.jpg
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